Karate is a discipline that is based on the principle that self-training, physically and mentally, protects one’s anger and encourages peaceful sentiment. Karate, meaning “empty hands” in Japanese, is a combat sport in which it is required to use only arms and no other body parts. It also means that Karateka should empty his/her aggressive mind. Karate is generally known as “Kenpo”, that is “First Rule”. It was developed from various Chinese fighting methods called “Te” and mostly composed of hand techniques. In 1923 the Okinawans changed the character of Karate, which was then Chinese to that of a Japanese character. Karate was brought to Turkey together with Judo after Halil Yüceses’s return from Japan, Wrestling trainer, in 1962. This sport became popular through some Judo teachers’ training with some Karate techniques and use of these techniques in infighting training of the Turkish Armed Forces. Karate was federated by the reorganising of Turkish Judo and Karate Federation to Turkish Judo Federation in 1980. Turkish Karate Federation was founded in 1990.

TERMINOLOGY:

  • Karateka: A person who practice karate.
  • Dan: Degrees (Black belt and higher).
  • Karategi: Karate Uniform.
  • Obi: Belt.
  • Osu (Oss): A type of standing indicating respect, desire and preparation.
  • Tobi Geri: Flying Kick.
  • Otagai-ni-Rei: Bow to each other.
  • Kata: Kata literally means "shape" or "model". Kata is a formalized sequence of movements which represent various offensive and defensive postures. These postures are based on idealized combat applications.
  • Kihon: Karate styles place varying importance on kihon. Typically this is performance in unison of a technique or a combination of techniques by a group of karateka. Kihon may also be prearranged drills in smaller groups or in pairs.
  • Tatami: It is a type of mat, used as a competition area.
  • Yuko: One Point.
  • Ippon: Two Point.
  • Hacime: Start.
  • Hikiwake: Tie.
  • Nagachi: Winner.
  • Aka: Red corner.
  • Aol: Blue corner.